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real estate private equity capital raising

Source: New York Times

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Throughout April, investors on Sterlinks offered us their thoughts on the best meetings they’ve had with investment managers.  In turn, we put together a list of key takeaways for you to keep in mind as you prepare for your next investor meeting.

First, the absolute basics regarding content to cover in an initial investor meeting, usually with a presentation.

Below are some sections to include in a first presentation to an investor (as applicable to you).

  1. Executive Summary: Summarize the investment opportunity, including firm history, team (investment platform), high-level achievements and other highlights of the opportunity.

  2. Track Record: Recap your investment activity and performance to date. A table summarizing your portfolio(s) is best-practice here.

  3. Investment Opportunity: Provide an overview of the opportunity you are presenting, including macro/micro drivers and trends, favorable market positioning, unique aspects of your platform, etc.

  4. Investment Philosophy: Succinctly describe the strategy that guides your investment process. This can include investment criteria, targeted asset characteristics and tactics.

  5. Investment Process: Review key elements of your investment process, such as sourcing of investments, underwriting, financing, investment committee, asset management and disposition.

  6. Pipeline: Characterize representative transactions either by describing actual opportunities in the pipeline or previous investments that resemble future investment activity your team may undertake.

  7. Case Studies: Offer a sampling of historical investments that demonstrate your team’s skill and experience.

  8. Offering Terms: Outline the essential points of your investment offering, such as the targeted return, commitment period/term, expected leverage, distributions and fees.

  9. Team Biographies: Condense the bios of senior management team members into relevant experience and achievements. This level of detail can also be provided in an appendix.

  10. Appendixes: Extra detail on any section can be provided in an appendix.

  11. All of the above should be kept to a concise and bulletized format.

Next up: best practices for any investor conversation.  Part 2 will address common wisdom for communicating with a potential investor.

Part 3 will get into the feedback that you probably never got from an investor.

This is the Sterlinks blog. Access Sterlinks tools to maximize your in-house resources by visiting http://www.sterlinks.net.

Last week Norges Bank Investment Management (NBIM) – the entity that controls Norway’s $890 billion wealth fund – announced that it would be ramping up its investment into global real estate.

The fund has been permitted to invest into real estate since 2011 and at the end of 2013 held 1% of its portfolio in real estate. However, because its target allocation is actually 5%, it will seek to invest 1% of its fund in each of the next three years.  Yes, $27 billion looking for real estate investments during the next three years.

There are a few interesting components to their strategy.  First, NBIM staff dedicated to real estate will increase to about 200 people – a lot more eyes, ears, and hands to source and manage their real estate investments.  Geographically, most of NBIM’s recent investment has focused on the US and Europe and they will now look at other major markets in Asia and “global cities outside Europe.”  This could include a more direct stake in emerging markets.  Finally, NBIM will be doing fewer JVs and looking to manage fully-owned properties, plus an increase in active involvement with development.  Part of this strategy will also be seeking public-to-private transactions.

Not only does this story underscore some of the trends identified in our earlier posts in this space (e.g., Capital Surge), but it is also interesting to think about its impact on the marketplace.  NBIM’s activities could be seen as a significant competitive presence to other buyers and sellers of real estate investments. Plus, the weight of capital in the more attractive markets may affect pricing and risk-adjusted returns.

NBIM, as stated before, plans to increase the number of staff dedicated to real estate to approximately 200 professionals.  Regardless of the number of staff dedicated to an investment strategy, the ability to manage information between team members and coordinate intelligence-gathering is critical.  While investors continue to seek ways to automate paper-based processes and access broader data, they are also looking for ways to quickly and efficiently distribute updates within their own organizations, no matter how small or large.   Accordingly, transparency and communication is the hallmark of the most adept fund managers. Today, cleverly designed technology infrastructure can go a long way in supporting highly effective investors and investment managers.

This is the Sterlinks blog. Access Sterlinks tools to maximize your internal resources by visiting http://www.sterlinks.net.

As mentioned earlier in our “Capital Surge” post from a few days ago, the “2013 Institutional Real Estate Allocations Monitor” from Cornell University & Hodes Weill identified some interesting trends in the industry.  We’d like to expand upon another noteworthy takeaway from that study today, including a bit more recent info:

“Institutions continue to shift from direct investing to outsourcing to third-party managers.”

It’s been explained that the flow of capital into real estate will be steady in the coming years. A particularly active set of investors will be small to medium-sized institutional investors (i.e., under $50 billion in global AUM).  One of the likeliest vehicles for smaller players to place capital would be through private funds.  In fact, 66% of investors with under $50 billion in AUM will invest via private funds.

In contrast, investors with over $50 billion in AUM (just 47% in funds) tend to prefer JVs, separate accounts, or going direct.  For example, large insurance companies tend to focus on larger, lower-yielding core deals and have bigger staffs who can more readily manage their investments without 3rd parties.

Meanwhile, the private real estate funds will see a rise in interest coming from these several investors looking to increase their under-target allocations.  As such, investors will soon be competing to place their capital into the best funds and, in turn, investment managers will be fielding more investor requests (e.g., Due Diligence Questionnaires).

Case in point: data-provider Preqin has some revealing stats in its Q1 2014 Quarterly Update that shows 54% of private funds that closed in Q1 2014 either met or exceeded their capital targets.  Furthermore, their May Real Estate Update reveals that funds focused on Europe – one of the most attractive investment regions currently – have met or exceeded their capital raising goals in 72% of the funds that closed in Q1 2014.  While this is up from 2013 and 2012 (57% and 46%, respectively), what is most remarkable is that 29% of the European focused funds exceeded their fund raising goals by more than 25%.  An additional tidbit is that in the past year the average time these funds are marketing has dropped to 17 months from 19 months.

A corollary to this is that mediocre managers may take advantage of the large amount of capital eagerly seeking a home. Investors will need to maintain their rigorous investment review processes in order to place capital in those “best in class” funds. As capital surges into real estate it will likely become increasingly competitive for all.  Parties who are able to use technology to be efficient and maximize their resources during this screening and selection process will have a leg up on their peers.

Check back with us soon as we delve into one of the report’s other key conclusions.

This is the Sterlinks blog. Access Sterlinks tools to maximize your due diligence resources by visiting http://www.sterlinks.net.

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